Wednesday, 1 March 2017

How to get the best results on a visit to Singapore's tropical bird park in Jurong

Photo by Robin Nichols(Note: I can probably remember half the names of the birds posted here - but decided not to waste time naming everything, preferring to post the day's results first...).
Although I really don't like seeing beautiful birds cooped up in small cages, a trip to the bird park in western Singapore is well worth the $3 MRT ticket (from the city) and the $29 entrance fee (actually you can get entrance cheaper if you buy a visit all four zoo attractions pass for $69...

Though the park is located in a light industrial part of the city, once through the gates, you step into a different world. Most of the enclosures are large and there are 8 or ten that you can freely walk into, including one aviary that has its own 30metre high waterfall and full size tropical trees - so it's really a piece of enclosed jungle complete with a myriad range of birds from all over the region.

Shooting tips:

If you shoot the birds in the walk-in enclosures the process is quite straight forward: match the shutter speed to the focal length magnification (i.e. if shooting with a 300mm tele lens on an APS-C sensor camera), use a shutter speed of at least 1/300s, faster where possible, to negate camera shake. We were shooting at ISO 1600, 3200, and even higher, under the canopy in the enclosures just to avoid camera/lens shake.

Tips on shooting small birds through the cage mesh
If you are shooting through wire mesh, all you'll see is wire mesh with a bird just in the background.
To get a better result avoid shooting where the sun is actually shining on the mesh exterior.
Always shoot at the widest aperture (i.e. f4 or f2.8 where possible - the shallow depth of field that this produces is less likely to make the out of focus mesh appear too noticeable in the frame.
In this example I shot the bird at f4, then at f11 - neither were that good because the bird was only 150mm behind the mesh.
If you physically get close to the mesh - and the bird is 2 metres into the cage, you'll almost certainly eliminate the mesh entirely - but because you are effectively shooting through a soft focus filter (photographers used to shoot through a piece of nylon stocking to soften the image) you will need to add contrast in post to make the image appear more lifelike.

Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Robin Nichols
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens
Photo by Natalie Hitchens

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: only a member of this blog may post a comment.